Philadelphia, PA: Maker Jawn

The Maker Jawn Initiative at the Free Library of Philadelphia is a team of artists, engineers, designers, and thinkers who work in libraries. We are united in our dedication to mentoring non-dominant youth as well as their families in creative technology. We are located in all six North Philadelphia neighborhood libraries. We encourage makers of all ages through access to resources, tools, and safe spaces for interest driven projects. Maker Jawn experiments with creating replicable, scalable spaces and programs that prioritize the creativity, cultural heritage, and interests of diverse communities, embedded directly within the fabric of the library.

http://www.makerjawn.org/

Youth-run Design and Research at the Free Library of Philadelphia, Summer 2012

From July to August 2012, 35 teens from Philadelphia worked at the Free Library to give their voice to what sort of environment and programs the library should offer for youth in Philly.

35 youth ages 14-19 served as Teen Programming Assistants for the Free Library of Philadelphia’s 2012 Summer Literacy and Leadership Program—a program funded by WorkReady Philadelphia. Read the rest »

The Free Library of Philadelphia’s Maker Jawn Initiative Receives IMLS Leadership Grant

The Free Library of Philadelphia’s Maker Jawn Initiative has been awarded a National Leadership Grant for multi-generational Makerspaces in North Philadelphia, where we have been focusing our efforts as a YOUmedia Learning Lab, creating scalable space for youth programming. The Free Library initiative is one of only 31 projects chosen nationwide to receive a National Leadership Grant from IMLS. Read the rest »

Philly Teens Prep for College Through Making and Badging

The summer before freshman year at college can be tricky—filled with anticipation, transitions, and sometimes nerves. For teens participating in a college preparation program at the Free Library of Philadelphia last summer, it was also filled with making, film production, and creating a set of badges for younger kids. Read the rest »