Further Reading

Below are resources that may be useful in your efforts to engage youth in learning, with digital media at the core.

 

Research Updates

 

Playmakers is an ongoing series of interviews with creators of video games that spark learning. Videos are published weekly on the Playmakers website as well as on FastCompany.com.

A must-watch for those interested in connected learning is Connected Learning tv and the "Essence of Connected Learning" playlist on Vimeo, or on YouTube.

Research Reports

 

Members of the Connected Learning Research Network have launched two websites that offer research, blogs, video and weekly webinars for educators, researchers, policymakers, youth workers, and parents:

Austin, M., and Richards, K. (2010). Supporting young new media producers across learning spaces: A longitudinal study of the Digital Youth Network. In Proceedings of the 9th International Conference of the Learning Sciences, 2, 203-210. New Brunswick, NJ: International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS).

Barron, B., Gomez, K., Martin, C. K., & Pinkard, N. (Eds.) (in press). Excelling in the new millennium: Making spaces for urban youth to create with new media. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Davidson, C., Goldberg, D., & Jones, Z. (2009). The future of learning institutions in a digital age. MacArthur Foundation Reports on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Gardner, H., Straughn, C., and Weigel, M. (2009). Multiple worlds: Adolescents, new digital media, and shifts in habits of mind. [pdf] Cambridge, MA: Harvard University, Goodwork Project.

Herr-Stephenson, B. et al. (2011). Digital media and technology in afterschool programs, libraries, and museums. MacArthur Foundation Reports on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Ito, M., et al.. (2009). Living and learning with new media: Summary of findings from the Digital Youth Project. MacArthur Foundation Reports on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

OECD, Connected Minds: How Technology Influences Learners (Brookings Institution Press, forthcoming).

Salen, K. (2011, March 24). Computer games don’t rot the brain: They help us learn. TheAtlantic.com.

Documentation & Evaluation

Austin, K., Ehrlich, S. B., Puckett, C., & Singleton, J. (2011). YOUmedia Chicago: Reimagining learning, literacies, and libraries, a snapshot of year 1. Chicago: Consortium on Chicago School Research, University of Chicago.